Wood Router Hacks – 5 Wood Router Tips and Tricks



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Author: WoodWorkWeb

26 thoughts on “Wood Router Hacks – 5 Wood Router Tips and Tricks

  1. That's an excellent tip for truing the edge of a board without a jointer. This is the perfect solution when I want to glue 2 boards together, and they aren't 100% true and there's a slight bow or dip between the 2 edges. Thanks!

  2. Thank you so much for your router tips, they were all excellent, the one that really caught me eye was the simple jig made out of three pieces of scrap wood for cutting slots.
    It really is going to be a must have for site work. If it gets lost, broken or "borrowed" why worry I can make another in a few minutes.
    Thanks so much
    Regards
    Chris

  3. I've used hot glue to mount a ragged piece of wood to a straight-edged sacrificial wood piece and used my table saw or a trim router to create a straight edge. Once done, the joint is fairly easily peeled off and the hot glue can also be peeled off with no marks. Just have to make sure the ragged piece is well-seated and parallel to the sacrificial surface.
    Same idea works with planing small pieces. Stick them to a large wooden support. Just make sure there's enough glue to hold it securely.
    Thanks for the tips!

  4. Thanks for the tips!!
    But why should one never use a miter gage in combination with a fence? I've done it a few times and it works great to keep long work pieces at 90°

  5. at 2:35 why dont youse a miter gauge with a fence? I am brand new to woodworking, would be great if someone could answer this for me. Enjoying this video and i love the idea for keeping the bits organized.

  6. The tip about making a mortise: I was taught not to use the flat of the router base against the guide fence as any rotation will misalign the bit. If you use the round side and the base rotates it will not alter the distance from the fence

  7. I do the same thing for drill bits that you do for your router bits. I have 5 drill bits I always use in my shop. The block of wood, with the drill bits, sits next to my drill press. I labeled the block of wood to show the size of the each bit.
    Great video. Looking forward to watching more.
    Barry G. Kery

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