All About Wood Drill Bits: Woodworking for Beginners #6 – woodworkweb



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35 thoughts on “All About Wood Drill Bits: Woodworking for Beginners #6 – woodworkweb

  1. Cormann has an instinct for steadfastly serving his own interests (grabbing every possible entitlement and privilege that flows form his parliamentary position – very uncool but what’s to say is wrong about that?) but that is part of his ideology so can’t but accept that that is the nature of his beast. He comes across as an android but his mindless efficiency and seemingly unconscious sanguine has I’m sure been of service to this country.

  2. I have been remiss in telling you how much I enjoy your videos. I have watched them all over time and really enjoy them. I live in New York City in an apartment and can't set up aworkshop but love watching woodworking shows. Keep those videos coming and thanks for keeping a retired fellow happy.

  3. One question . If you could help me determine what is this piece for. Looks like a center punch tool but the pointed end is hollow and its body looks like a sanding file . The end that maybe goes inside the drill is cubical shape not cylindrical. What is it ? Thanks

  4. yes you are absolutly right, it s basic but not all people know that, and i am one of them. very good video, thanks and just subscribed to your channel.

  5. You should put a warning out concerning the other bits which have a "screw type tip".  I have use a bit that was used for a "Brace and Bit" and cut off the square end to put on my hand drill.  That screw tip dug into the wood so fast that I almost got hurt.  They are really meant for a slow turning so if you have a variable speed drill, this would be excellent.  I found by filing off the screw end tip (making it into a brad point)  greatly helps reduce any accident.  If not beware and be prepared.  Tim

  6. Very well done. My question is what is the difference between the applications for the spade bit vs. the Forstner bit? It seems that it may be a question of how finished you want the hole to be. You did say that the spade bit was for rough construction.

  7. I HOPE U NEVER STOP GIVIN US TUTORIAL…I THINK COMPARE THE OTHER YOUTUBERS FOR WOOD WORKING PROJECT, U HAVE THE BEST EXPLANATION ….U START IT FROM THE BASIC ONE, N I REALLY APPRECIATE IT…..THANK U ONCE AGAIN

  8. I LOVE U SIR IT REALLY HELP ME A LOT TO UNDERSTAND SINCE AM A GIRL N AM STUDY IN ARCHITECTURE NOW….N LATELY I HAVE THIS DREAM TO HAVE MY OWN WORKSHOP SO I CAN BUILT MY OWN FURNITURE……THIS VIDEO REALLY GIVEN ME A GOOD START….THANK U …AM SUBSCRIBE U NOW

  9. thank you for yer time in showing these things. i now make my kids view the various segments on particular tools prior to being checked out on them in fact. thank you.  that said i would like to add the black oxide coating on the twist bits is to prevent galling (or metal sticking/welding) on the bit. steel should always use black oxide, always use bright (the silver finish) for aluminum, it will gall on black oxide) the titanium nitride finish is a good wear resistance and came on newer in my career so i can't speak of it's anti galling features, but i would imagine is it good, it certainly is abrasive resistance and wood is up there as an abrasive material, wood gives and tears more than metals. if you happen to run into cobalt drills (5% mostly), which are generally bright finish, they are very good at keeping their hot hardness, (abrasive and harder materials tend to heat up the cutting edge of the drill) probably overkill for wood, but cheaper than carbide for example. H.S. keeps it's hardness at a higher temperature than a typical carbon tool steel which is the cheapest drill material in terms of initial cost. good for occasional use is the argument given, but i always get HS steel if possible. wood can heat a point up real quick! i could ramble on forever, we haven't even covered angles and split points etc, and i am sorry bout goin on like that., but the black oxide finish is something important one should know i think.  and please don't take that as a criticism, you rock on sir. thank you

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