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2017 – Yale Tunnel

2017 – Yale Tunnel
rock lights for trucks
Image by Ted’s photos – For Me & You
We made a 2 day visit to Salmon Arm BC visiting a friend who was dog sitting at a country home in Tappen for a couple of months.

Travelling east from Vancouver we avoid the Coquihalla Highway #5 and take the old Trans-Canada Highway #1 for two reasons – the speed limit on the Coq is 120 Km/hr which means too many idiots do 150 and they scare the shit out of us and number two, the scenery on #1 is much nicer including the Fraser River Canyon tunnels between Yale and Boston Bar. The down side is it takes 50 minutes longer to reach Kamloops than driving the Coq.

ABOUT THE TUNNELS:
The Fraser Canyon Highway Tunnels were constructed from the spring of 1957 to 1964 as part of the Trans-Canada Highway project.

There are seven tunnels in total, the shortest being about 57 metres (187 ft); the longest, however, is about 610 metres (2,000 ft) and is one of North America’s longest. They are situated between Yale and Boston Bar.

In order from south to north, they are: Yale (completed 1963), Saddle Rock (1958), Sailor Bar (1959), Alexandra (1964), Hell’s Gate (1960), Ferrabee (1964) and China Bar (1961).

The Hell’s Gate tunnel is the only tunnel that does not have lights, while the China Bar tunnel is the only tunnel that requires ventilation.

The China Bar and Alexandra tunnels have warning lights that are activated by cyclists before they enter the tunnels. This was required because the tunnels are curved. It is expected that the Ferrabee tunnel will get the same warning lights as it too is curved.

THE TRANS-CANADA HIGHWAY:
Construction of the Trans-Canada Highway formally began in 1950 and would continue for several years.

The Highway was officially opened by Prime Minister John Diefenbaker at a ceremony at Roger’s Pass Summit, British Columbia on September 3, 1962, with a follow-up cermony in Wawa the following summer. Newfoundland was the last province to complete its highway, in 1967.

The Trans-Canada Highway between Victoria (BC) and St. John’s (NF) is the world’s longest national highway with a length of 7,821 km (4,860 mi).